Friday, September 23, 2011

Autumn Veggies

The weather forecast for the weekend is rain, clouds, and more rain. They forecast a brief 3 hour window Friday morning before it would start raining. Not wanting to get shut out of photography at Great Meadows for a whole week and with rumors of warblers in the area, I set out to get some quick photos before the rains descended.

Arriving on site with my long lens in hand, the bird activity was minimal and warblers were not being observed. However, in the brief 4 days since I was last here the refuge has started to explode with color! Trees that were green on Monday, were not starting to turn. Since birds weren't readily available, I used the long lens to shoot foliage close ups.


Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
Smartweed turning on the Dike

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
A view towards the trees near the tower


With the slow morning, I was enjoying a relaxed conversation on the Dike with Will and Alan. Soon the Fish & Wildlife folks arrived. We are always curious about their activities so we wandered over to inquire what they were doing today. Amber Carr accompanied by interns Kristen and Ryan were going to be doing vegetation surveys in the lower impoundment.

Amber Carr is one of the Fish & Wildlife Biologists and was nice enough to explain the process before they set off in their canoe. So now rather than complaining about the weight of the long lens with nothing to photograph, I was now happy I had it. Without it I would not have been able to take these photos of them in action from the shore.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
Amber prepares to show me the process

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
About 30 data points in the lower impoundment have been identified for data collection

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
The flip side contains the GPS locations of each data point. Next to it is the sheet where they report the species observed and the percent of the area it occupies.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
They nominally use a canoe, but it is easier to drag it through the water than paddle it through all the vegetation


Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
Kristen monitors the GPS and provides directions to the next data point

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
Arriving at their data point they throw out this rig which defines the area to be surveyed

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
Ryan is examining vegetation while they log the results

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
They also measure the height of the vegetation and the density in a three meter area. Amber is holding the measuring pole at the waterline, while Kristen determines the height of the vegetation.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
Then they begin the slow walk to the next data point



Here are a couple bonus shots from the morning.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
If you look closely you will notice ladybugs everywhere. Here one is on the smartweed.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
Alan was "complaining" that I didn't have enough birds in flight. So these ducks are for him.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;
It's not clear whether there are more lady bugs of frogs. If you are paying attention you will hear frogs jumping off the edges of the paths to safety as you walk by.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20110923 &emdash;

I slowly crawled up to this Leopard Frog, stopping to take photos as I went. I finally got so close that with my macro lens I could not fit the whole frog in my viewfinder. Will saw how close I was and inquired if I had glued the frog to the ground. Being so close I had to take this portrait shot. I try to avoid stressing or scaring the subjects, but often times if you are patient enough and make very small moves over time some animals will allow you close.

No comments:

Post a Comment