Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Great Meadows 2012 Calendar

A recent family Tradition is the annual photo gift calendar. Spoiler Alert!!! If you have received one the last two years, please stop reading, or you may spoil your present for this year.

For everyone else, due to quantity purchasing discounts I will have a very limited number of extra calendars that I have available for sale. Images have been selected from this year's photography project at Great Meadows and are appropriate to the season. (Of all the thousands of photographs I took this year, it was tough to winnow the field to just 13 that were representative of the whole year at Great Meadows.)

The price is $15 including shipping by First Class mail within the United States. Each calendar is 8.5 x 11 inches, spiral bound. If you are interested, email me at Larry@LightChronicle.com. Payment will be on-line via PayPal.

Here are the photos contained in this year's calendar. Click on the images to see a slideshow of larger size images.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
Cover

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
January

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
February

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
March

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
April

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
May

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
June

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
July

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
August

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
September

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
October

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
November

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM2011Calendar &emdash;
December

Sunday, November 27, 2011

To See What You Can't See

It's been a busy weekend, but I did get a couple chances to slip over to Great Meadows, between projects, tasks and planned activities. This morning when I awoke the view out the window was grey fog. I thought there must be some interesting photos to be had in the fog.

Some quick mental calculations yielded that if I hurried, I could get in a quick half hour of photography before heading to church. So here is the best that I could capture in that 30 minutes.


Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
Looking back up the drive. I love that S curve.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
The woods slowly transition to grey

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
A different view of my most frequent photo

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
A spot to contemplate, what you can't see in the impoundments

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
The towering oaks form the gateway to the parking lot


The closer you got to the impoundments, the more restricted your visibility and fewer interesting shadows on your horizon.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
Most of the geese were grounded

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
A few geese must be IFR capable

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;


The cool damp fog, covered the cobwebs with dew. On a normal day, if you are standing at the right angle you can often see the silk threads shining in the sun. Covered with dew, you realize that they blanket most all the plants on the dike.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
Evening Primrose

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
Vervain

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111127 &emdash;
The perfect spider web

Saturday, November 26, 2011

Not on the Honey-Do List

It's only a matter of before outdoor photography will require multiple layers, heavy coats, boots, gloves, hand warmers and frequent battery changes. Since Saturday was going to be unseasonably warm, how can one sleep in? With a schedule of several "Honey-Do" tasks awaiting me, I had to get up early to sneak in a little photography.

With my limited time, my strategy was a quick out and back to Borden's pond to see what was going on. Primarily there were the usual suspects, but a couple of things caught my eye.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;
I can't believe how the goose in their path continues to eat through the entire sequence

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;
A group of gulls flew by

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;
With toes like that, the itch will not stand a chance

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;
I love the way the back lighting brings out the details

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111126 &emdash;

Monday, November 21, 2011

Thanksgiving Potpourri

Knowing that most of this weekend would be preoccupied with Thanksgiving traditions including eating, raking leaves, cleaning gutters, and making final preparations to the house to face winter, I went to Great Meadows late Monday afternoon to bank a few shots that I could share over the weekend.

It was a quiet day at the refuge. Here are a few of the things that caught my eye.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
The fallen tree near the parking lot. All year I've looked at this tree and tried to think how I could photograph it. Today it hit me, to photograph it from the side.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
The mysterious, "UFO Landing spot" of crushed reeds near the kiosk. Perhaps this was caused by snow blowing off the trees near by during the snow storm. Supporting that theory is that the reeds are all bent in the same direction.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash; >
Chickadee in the trees near the kiosk

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
Coot Stretching

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
Muskrat heading home towards the setting sun

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
What Mute Swans like to eat

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
I love the water drops frozen in space

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
Sparrow along the path

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
Sparrow in the cattails facing the setting sun

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
Dike Trail light up in the setting sun

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
Another tree I've liked, but never got the right photo, until today. The reflected setting sun makes the difference.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111121 &emdash;
Sunset viewed from the end of the lower impoundment

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Lights Are On, But Nobody Is Home

Sunday morning, I awoke before the sun and headed to Great Meadows. I was inspired by attending a meeting with other nature photographers the night before. Many shared their beautiful images, including a few Marsh Wrens and Red-winged Blackbirds from Great Meadows.

My objective this morning was to see if I could capture the beavers near the lower impoundment in action. (Beavers are most active at dawn and dusk).

Walking through the woods along the railroad bed and maintenance road prior to the sun rising above the trees was quite cool. I arrived at the outflow of the lower impoundment, I surprised a Ring Necked Duck before it realized that people were up.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;

At the beaver lodge, there were no beaver present. You can see that they are quite active in the area. The beaver slide through the cattails was still damp. A bit further up the path you could see that the beavers had felled the tree that they had eaten significantly through in my last post. Several new tress had signs of beavers gnawing, while ones they had started to eat had much more bark and wood missing. I hung around a while hoping they would emerge, but with the sun rising, beautiful light everywhere, and a fixed time to leave, paniccing that I might have anything to post, I moved on.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;


By the time I reached the intersection with the Cross Dike Trail, the wind was starting to pick up. Several coots were hanging out in the lee of the cattail reeds. One thing I like about photography is that it helps you see things you don't notice with the naked eye. I've been trying to capture a bird diving, without success - this is close, but just a moment too late. Another thing I noticed was that the coots would pull up some aquatic vegetation. Using small stick like pieces they would beat the water while twisting their head back and forth. I'm not sure what this accomplishes, but there were several series with similar actions.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;


But occasionally, you have to settle for normal poses in beautiful light.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;


Continuing back up the Cross Dike Trail, I encountered a Mute Swan that was also beautifully lit, in the midst of preening. Thought they are not very hospitable birds, they are beautiful.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;


Almost back to the car, I encountered this Swamp Sparrow among the cattail reeds near the bridge. It was foraging along the side of the path, but would retreat into the reeds when people passed. For a brief moment it posed on the reeds, while checking to see if the coast was clear.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111120 &emdash;