Thursday, December 15, 2011

Refuge As Art Museum

Thursday morning I got up to join Alan and Will on the weekly bird census. I did bring my camera, but my focus was improving seeing and identifying birds. The weather was gray and cold, with rain due imminently.

As we walked along the impoundment, one thing I noticed was the remains of bird nests along the trail. I had walked next to several of these many times and never noticed the nest. I guess my skills of observation have room for improvement. I'll have to make a mental note to check these locations next year.


Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111215 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111215 &emdash;


The predominate color in the refuge is brown. That's why anything green stands out. It's amazing that the muskrats can find green stalks below the water.


Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111215 &emdash;


Over the course of this year, I've noticed small piles of rocks, popping up around the refuge. I wondered about the story behind why they were there & who was creating them. Since it was such a mystery, I hadn't taken photos of them before. Here are some examples that I noticed on our walk today.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111215 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111215 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111215 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111215 &emdash;


Well this week Tom Hart, the artist / curator of these exhibits shared the story behind these works of art and how he started making small these piles of rocks in the Great Meadows google group.

As we walked around the refuge, I also notice a few art installations created by Nature, herself. Hope you enjoy them also.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111215 &emdash;
I love the way the leaf, is positioned in relation to the curves of the grain in the wood

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111215 &emdash;
The combination of fungi and the burl forms a natural face

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