Friday, October 21, 2011

Surprise Ending

Hoping to get some scenic foliage shots for my project, I arrived at Great Meadows shortly after sunrise. My plan was to warm up shooting (photographing) Canada Geese as they departed and then wander around the impoundment.

A large flock of Canada Geese took off as I was climbing the tower. They may have taken exception to all the noise the Argo made as the Fish & Wildlife staff drove out to check on the location of the female Blandings Turtles prior to starting today's canal dredging.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;
The Argo looks like fun. The closest thing to swamp buggy racing north of the Mason-Dixon line.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;


Normally Canada Geese start honking back and forth before departing. This morning the remaining groups stealthily took off without the pre-departure cacophony. (The reason you aren't looking at geese photos is because they either took off forcing me to shoot into the sun, or took a long looping takeoff down by the river resulting in tiny geese photos).

There are still a large number of coots swimming around the lower impoundment (They probably don't like the Argo either). They are more disbursed than Monday, often swimming and eating among the reeds.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;


Venturing on I captured some scenic photos of the foliage. This year the colors are somewhat muted and disappointing. The rain from the previous two days, has help strip some of the trees and raise the water level in the river.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;


I am attracted to the Milkweed pods that had not yet released all their seeds. I am fascinated with the silky coma that catches the wind floating balloon-like carrying the seed to it's final destination. With each gust of wind a few more seeds are pulled away from the pod, until they are finally all gone.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;


Completing my circumnavigation of the lower impoundment, I wandered down the Timber Trail. I was pleasantly surprised when I happened across the Great Horned Owl resting in the tree. Rather than immediately flying off he was content to watch me, watching him.

While I was wishing I had my long lens with me, I avoided actually kicking myself to avoid spooking him. He was not in the most photogenic of locations, but I tried to hold my camera steady to get a few snapshots for the record. Growing bored of watching me switch back and forth between camera and binoculars, he departed down river.

While I was still savoring that special experience another photographer ambled up (with the right gear on his shoulder) asking, "Anything interesting?" I hated to break the sad news to him...

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20111021 &emdash;