Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Changing Of The Guard

Tuesday, I returned to Great Meadows to see what has been happening. Scanning across the impoundments from the tower, much appeared to be the same since my last visit. A harrier was cruising the cat tails looking for prey.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;


Much of the impoundments are still frozen, to a depth sufficient to support Canada Geese and Mute Swans. But there were spots of open water. The swans were slowly opening channels to swim and feed in.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;


Elsewhere in the refuge the balance between winter and spring is starting to subtly change. There were more birds active than my last visit. Several muskrats could be seen active among the reeds and on the ice. Elsewhere, along the pools and streams, you can see signs of the ice melting. In the woods there are patches of green that we then frozen by the most recent storm.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;
I wonder who put the big gash in his tail. No wonder he ran as I approached.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;


The pattern of lichens growing on this tree made me think of a passage from Thoreau's journal.

Feb 5, 1853
A thick fog. The trees and woods look well through it. You are inclined to walk in the woods for objects. They are draped with mist, and you hear the sound of it dripping from them. It is a lichen day. Not a bit of rotten wood lies on the dead leaves, but it is covered with fresh, green cup lichens, etc., etc. All the world seems a great lichen and to grow like one to-day,—a sudden humid growth.

The weather was gray and cloudy. The photographic opportunities are somewhat sparse compared to the bounteous days of May. This patch of woods near the Southwest entrance has always appealed to me. Today, decided with the current conditions it was a good candidate for black & white.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120214 &emdash;

2 comments:

  1. I'm seeing large flocks of female red-wings in Sarasota FL. Hope the males are arriving at Great Meadows.

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