Friday, June 1, 2012

Before & After

Thursday I was visiting the refuge to join Alan Bragg's bird watcher walk. Friday morning found me back there to test out my new D7000. (My D300 was part of a most unfortunate accident. In the end the cost to repair exceeded the cost of a new used camera). So today's post contains photos shot from both days. See if you can identify which photos are from my D7000 and which are from the backup D90.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;
I arrived a bit early and surprised this Momma Wood Duck & chicks in the reeds quite near the dike

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;
The Canada Geese are rapidly growing up. Elsewhere in the refuge you can see larger chicks starting to get new feathers.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;
Most geese are content to step one side and let me pass. This one decided to move on.

This is the first time I noticed an Ebony Jewelwing in my walks are Great Meadows. The body was glowing an emerald green in the morning sun. Bryan Windmiller told me that they are commonly found in the woods along streams. I found the first one along the Upper Impoundment on the river side of the trail. Friday while back on the Timber Trail, I noticed a very similar damselfly in the woods along the Timber trail, except its body was a brilliant blue. Checking the Field Guide to Dragonflies & Damselflies of Massachusetts, I learned that it's the same creature, but their bodies appear blue when backlit.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;


Maybe its my imagination, but it seems like the dragonflies are out in force earlier this year.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;


I've noticed that I have been taking more photos of fauna, not flora. Unfortunately the early spring caused many flowering plants to bloom early. Right now it seems a bit quiet. However that allows us to enjoy that colors and shapes of other plants.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

I love how each layer of leaves is offset so as not to overlap the leaves below.

As a reward of circumnavigating the Lower Impoundment if you are observant you may notice this Tree Swallow nest.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;


Down near the refuge entrance by Borden's Pond there were Cedar Waxwings.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

Also near that entrance I've encountered a pair of Swamp Sparrows in the same general area. When I have a bit more time, I will have to camp out to see if they are nesting, or if it was a coincidence.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

One thing photographers like about Great Meadows is how some of the animals become habituated to humans. After a while you can't take any more Red-winged Blackbird photos. However, it's hard to pass up when the bird is sitting in a tree right next to the dike and is willing to sing as you walk past.

Light Chronicle | Photography: GM20120531 &emdash;

3 comments:

  1. I wonder if that second duckling is one of the Hooded Mergansers that have been with one of the mother Wood Ducks. The bill is hidden by the mother. Does it show in any of your rejected photos? Glad to see that you're back in business.

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    Replies
    1. The second duckling is a Hooded Merganser. you can also see the darker head with feathers sticking up.
      Great pictures Larry, the Damselfly is my favorite.
      Will

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  2. Wonderful ebony jewelwing photos. I've also seen them in the wood edges near Gowing's Swamp and the Ripley school field. All the bird in leafage portraits are great and I love the swallow peeping from its hollow!

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