Monday, August 5, 2013

It's Been A While

Between traveling, vacations and my summer photography project, I have hardly had a chance to make it over to Great Meadows. While I have missed it, my summer photography project has been exciting. I've been photographing loons from my kayak. I would encourage you to click on the link and take a brief detour to view some highlights from that project.

When I finally got over to Great Meadows I could see that summer was alive and displaying it's full glory. The lotus have expanded to consume most of both impoundments. It seems like they only liked last year's mowing. They are pretty flowers. It's just do they have take over the whole refuge?

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;

As you would expect there were many of the usual summer suspects at the refuge, but also quite a few of our special summer visitors.

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
Great Blue Herons flying to & fro

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
Flock of ducks leaving for the morning

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
Plenty of dragonflies including this Twelve Spotted Skimmer

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
In the woods the Eastern Wood-Pewee was calling. Though it is rather plain, it get's its name from its distinctive "pewee, pewee" call

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
This Cedar Wax-wing was hiding its head in the shadows to protest my absence

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
Summer sometimes brings us Egrets who alternate between fishing and preening

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
While Great Blue Herons are common, Green Herons are a bit more uncommon at Great Meadows. To see both together is rare. Green Herons look fairly large on their own, but look tiny next to the Great Blue. While the Green Heron wanted to fish in peace. the Great Blue kept pushing it along the bank.

Fish & Wildlife has lowered the water level in the lower impoundment in preparation for dredging out the canals in the lower impoundment. The vast areas of exposed mud has attracted the shorebirds.

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
Normally you would have to Plum Island to see Semi-palmated Plovers

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
But today they were flying around the imundment as a small flock

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;
If you look closely you will probably notice sandpipers foraging among the weeds in the mud

I know Purple Loosestrife is an invasive plant, but my photographer's eyee was attracted to the complementary purple and yellow colors.

Light Chronicle: GM20130805 &emdash;

Don't worry, I promise it won't be as long to my next Great Meadows blog post.

No comments:

Post a Comment