Monday, November 11, 2013

November means Waterfowl

Wow, it's been over a month since my last post. Sorry for the long gap. First there was the government shutdown, then a long trip to visit our daughter in Atlanta, sandwich around that all those typical autumn activities, combined with the daily activities of life and Poof before you know it a month has gone.

For photographers November is not a kind month. The beautiful flowers and greenery of summer, have morphed into the radiant colors of autumn, but now those leaves lie at our feet dull and brown. One of my friends calls this sticks & twigs season.

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At Great Meadows all is not lost. The impoundments are flooded. The cat tails are dying back and dropping over, letting us see areas that have been hidden much of the summer. Many birds have migrated giving the waterfowl an opportunity to entertain us.

Each morning we are entertained by the Canada Geese who depart to forage, but return later in the morning to cruise the impoundments. The mornings are cold & brisk, with both the people and birds trying to stay warm. I enjoy watching the geese fly. Given their large size they don't look air worthy, but once aloft do demonstrate a certain gracefulness. When they return landing crosses that gracefulness with the abruptness of an uncontrolled crash.

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Light Chronicle: GM20131111 &emdash;

Light Chronicle: GM20131111 &emdash;

Light Chronicle: GM20131111 &emdash;

Another star species of the month are the ducks. The mallards dominate. If we lived anywhere else where they weren't so plentiful we would wax poetically about how beautiful they are. Instead they take a back seat behind the Wood Ducks, Teals and other less common visitors who have stopped by.

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Light Chronicle: GM20131111 &emdash;

Light Chronicle: GM20131111 &emdash;

Light Chronicle: GM20131111 &emdash;

A female Northern Shoveler was swimming in circles in the Upper Impoundment, near the river side. It was feeding. Its oldly shped beak is well suited to the task. You must admit it looks a little like a bird designed by a committee.

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Light Chronicle: GM20131111 &emdash;

At this time of year even the swans are welcomed back. Though it with mixed emotions that we greet the darker juveniles.

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